The First Slave Freed by Abraham Lincoln: A Biographical Sketch of Nance Legins (Cox-Cromwell) Costley, circa 1813 1873

by Carl M. Adams A “Negro girle named Nance” first attracted nationwide attention in 1866, about eighteen months after the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Chapter three of Illinois Republican Congressman Isaac Newton Arnold’s book, The History of Abraham Lincoln and the Overthrow of Slavery (1866), is subtitled: “Pleads the Case of the Negro Girl … Read more

Richard Carwardine – 2018 Annual Banquet Speaker

As an undergraduate at Corpus Christi College, Oxford, in the 1960s, Richard Carwardine took his BA in Modern History. After graduation, he took up the Ochs- Oakes Graduate Scholarship in American History at The Queen’s College, Oxford; he spent a year at the University of California, Berkeley, during an era of campus convulsions (1969-70). “https://abrahamlincolnassociation.org/newsletters/winter2017.pdf”

Mr. Lincoln and Mrs. Partington

by Dr. James M. Cornelius Was Abraham Lincoln a rube or a well-read man? His brief meeting with one of England’s wealthiest and oldest aristocrats casts an interesting light upon this debate. The young Marquis of Hartington, heir to the Duke of Devonshire and representing a cotton-manufacturing district, held a junior post in Lord Palmerston’s … Read more

Mary Lincoln and the Swings

by Ann Ricker The decline of Mary Lincoln’s mental condition is a major theme of her life during the period from 1866 until her commitment for insanity in 1875. The elusive question of the exact nature of her illness includes a topic that is perhaps easier to grasp—the amount of social isolation that she experienced, … Read more

Lincoln’s Springfield – The Underground Railroad

By Richard E. Hart For a number of years I have been curious about the possible presence of the Underground Railroad in Lincoln’s Springfield. As a child on Sunday afternoon drives west of Springfield, my parents pointed out the small village of Farmingdale and told me that there had once been an Underground Railroad station … Read more

Illinois Ideological Battlegound of the Nation

by Daniel Willis The Lincoln-Douglas Debates occupy a unique position in Illinois history. For a short time, the Prairie State represented and highlighted the divisive forces affecting the nation. In the aftermath of the debates, the positions held by Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas came to be seen as a direct conflict of two … Read more

A New Look at “You Can Fool All of the People”

By David B. Parker In the winter 2003 issue of this newsletter, Thomas F. Schwartz, in one of his “Lincoln Never Said That” columns, wrote on one of the best known of the alleged Lincoln quotations: “You can fool all the people some of the time and some of the people all the time, but … Read more

Lincoln Portraits: An Interpretive Framework

by Michael Fowler Many American artists and writers have returned repeatedly through the years to convey something of the life and character of Abraham Lincoln. Biographies, paintings, articles, sculpture, and film about the man continue unabated to the present. They record, reinterpret, memorialize, somehow represent aspects of the great Emancipator, the savior of the Union, … Read more

Mr. Lincoln and Mrs. Partington

by Dr. James M. Cornelius Was Abraham Lincoln a rube or a well-read man? His brief meeting with one of England’s wealthiest and oldest aristocrats casts an interesting light upon this debate. The young Marquis of Hartington, heir to the Duke of Devonshire and representing a cotton-manufacturing district, held a junior post in Lord Palmerston’s … Read more

Lincoln’s Second Inauguration

by Thomas F. Schwartz In the autumn 1999 issue of this newsletter I published an excerpt from the diary of Solomon Wieder Hagerty (February 28, 1842–January 29, 1867) who served in the United States Marine Corps, from 1864 through 1866. The following entry vividly describes the events of March 4, 1865, for Abraham Lincoln’s second … Read more