Commemoration of 150th Anniversary of Lincoln’s Springfield Funeral

October 11, 2018

The 150th anniversary of the funeral of Abraham Lincoln was commemorated in Springfield on May 2 and 3, 2015. Thousands of people participated in the various events that included lectures and church services, lunch-eons and teas, school children visits and open houses, exhibits and receptions and encampments and a reenactment of the arrival of Lincoln’s body and the funeral procession from downtown Springfield to Oak Ridge Cemetery’s receiving vault. The emotion engendered by the hearse and procession entering Oak Ridge Cemetery, as shown in the photograph to the right, was extraordinary. A 200-voice choir quietly sang, a sole drummer beat out a slow tempo, the slow and deliberate clip-clopping of the horses and the tolling of the Oak Ridge Cemetery bell in the tower (shown in the photograph) combined to create a solemn mood seldom experienced. The entire commemoration cannot be adequately described in words, but the photographs printed on pages 10 and 11 will give a sense of the events. Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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A Psalm To Our Martyred President Abraham Lincoln

October 11, 2018

Performed by Fred Morsell on February 12, 2015 I come before you this evening with much diffidence: the rarest gifts and the best eloquence might well be employed here and now, and yet fail of justice to the dignity and solemnity of this occasion, as well as the character of the illustrious deceased we tonight remember. Had Abraham Lincoln died from any of the numerous ills to which flesh is heir; had he reached that good old age of which his vigorous constitution and his temperate habits gave promise; had he seen the end of the great work which it was his good fortune to inaugurate, our task this evening though sad and painful would be very simple. Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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Banquet Performance: Frederick Douglass’ – Eulogy to Lincoln Re-enacted by Fred Morsell

October 10, 2018

Fred Morsell began to study Frederick Douglass in the fall of 1984. A black clergyman friend asked him to help develop alternative programs for inner city youth that would help them find a sense of self-respect and belief in themselves — an antidote to the environment of drugs and hopelessness in which they lived. Morsell read Douglass’ Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave. He said the book “practically blew me away. It read like a screenplay, because Douglass’ descriptions of the events of his life were so visually intense and dramatic. The images literally jumped off the page at me. Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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Did Lincoln Dream He Died?

October 10, 2018

By Jonathan W. White Americans have been dreaming about Abraham Lincoln since at least 1861. In May of that year, a woman from Roches-ter, New York, sent a letter to Mary Todd Lincoln describing a dream that she’d had of the president towering over Washington, D.C., amid a tremendous thunderstorm. As the lightning flashed and the thunder boomed, the sun cast “a soft mellow light around about him.” Beneath Lincoln’s feet “rolled dark & heavy clouds which the sun light was fast dispelling.” Lincoln held a book in one hand, walked toward the southern part of the horizon, “crowned with honors & covered with Laurels, and looked very smiling.” This was a premonition, the woman thought, that Lincoln would re-store the Union and free the slaves. In “these perilous times” she hoped that her dream would be “a comfort” to the first lady. During the war, at least two soldiers dreamed that their commander-in-chief granted them promotions, while a Union POW at Macon Prison, in Georgia, dreamed that he had a conversation with Lincoln about prisoner exchanges. In like manner, a correspondent for Harper’s Weekly “dreamed that Old ‘Abe’ was sitting in our room talking with my mother.” She asked the presi-dent “how soon he thought the war would be over.” Lincoln answered, “not before I’m out.” Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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The Lincoln Ox Yoke at the University of Illinois

October 10, 2018

By John Hoffmann One of the most valued artifacts owned by the University of Illinois is an ox yoke–not an ordinary ox yoke but one believed to have been made by Abraham Lincoln himself. The traditional story of this yoke rests on brief references to it in 1875 and fuller accounts of it in 1900. Recently, however, information at odds with those statements has come to light. This paper undertakes to set forth the conflicting evidence regarding the history of the “Lincoln ox yoke.” Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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Abraham Lincoln’s Cooper Union Address

October 10, 2018

By Richard Brookhiser The first half of the Cooper Union Address was a response to a speech by Stephen Douglas. Campaigning for a fellow Democrat in Ohio in September 1859, Douglas had said, “our fathers, when they framed the government under which we live, under-stood this question just as well, and even better, than we do now.” “This question” was whether the federal government could restrict the expansion of slavery into the territories. Douglas argued that federal control would violate the principle of self-government; each territory’s inhabitants should decide for themselves whether to allow slavery or not. Lincoln at Cooper Union agreed with Douglas that “our fathers” knew best what America’s founding principles were, but he proposed to show that they agreed with him—that the federal government could, and should, limit slavery’s expansion. Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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Thomas F. Schwartz – 2014 BANQUET SPEAKER

October 10, 2018

A familiar face will return to Spring-field for the 2014 Banquet. Dr. Tho-mas F. Schwartz will be the banquet speaker on Wednesday, February 12, 2014. His address is entitled, “Everything is darkness and doubt and discouragement”: Lincoln and the Election of 1864.

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John Hay Reports on Events at Gettysburg

October 10, 2018

John Hay (1838-1905), who served as Lincoln’s assistant private secretary from 1860 to 1865, kept an informative diary during the Civil War. Unfortunately, the entry describing events in Gettysburg on November 19, 1863, is frustratingly skimpy: “In the morning I got a beast and rode out with the President’s suite to the Cemetery in the procession. The procession formed itself in an orphanly sort of way & moved out with very little help from anybody & after a little delay Mr. Everett took his place on the stand – And Mr. Stockton made a prayer which thought it was an oration – and Mr. Everett spoke as he always does perfectly – and the President in a firm free way, with more grace than is his wont said his half dozen words lines of consecration and the music wailed and we went home through crowded and cheering streets. And all the particulars are in the daily papers.” Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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Juan Rafael Mora and Abraham Lincoln: Men of Steel

October 10, 2018

By Robert J. Lenz President The Abraham Lincoln Association President Juan Rafael Mora is regarded as the most important political figure of Costa Rica and Central America in the 19th century. It is believed there are many similarities between the life of Lincoln and the life of Mora. In preparation for the February 8, 2014 bicentennial of President Mora, the Club Union and La Tertuilia Del 56 held their first banquet in 2011. Their purpose is scholarship and public education about Mora, similar to the purposes of The Abraham Lincoln Association as to President Lincoln. The organizations are supported by many of the leading citizens, public figures, and scholars of Costa Rica.

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Abraham Lincoln in Goshen Indiana’s 1860 Campaign Banner

October 10, 2018

By Ervin Beck The campaign banner reproduced here was painted by J. H. Dille for the Wide Awake club of the Republican Party to use in a daylong rally in Goshen, Indiana, for the Lincoln-Hamlin ticket. The rally, on Saturday, October 6, 1860, featured a speech by the famous abolitionist U.S. Senator Cassius M. Clay of Kentucky. The banner depicts Abraham Lincoln, candidate for President of the United States; Hannibal Hamlin, candidate for Vice-President; and Henry Smith Lane, candidate for Governor of Indiana. Read The Full Newsletter Below (Please allow a few minutes to load the file)

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